Tagged: Sustainability

Kenya to evict forest dwellers to increase water supply - Crikey Creek

Daniel Collins Nov 16, 2009

The NYT has a tragic story about a hunter-gatherer group in Kenya that may lose its ancestral forest home. The Kenyan government is gearing up to evict tens of thousands of settlers, illegal or not, from the Mau Forest, the Ogiek’s ancestral home and a critical water source for this entire country. The question is: Will the few thousand … Read More

Bjorn Lomborg’s op-ed sense and non-science - Crikey Creek

Daniel Collins Nov 12, 2009

Bjorn Lomborg, noted climate change contrarian, has a point. Climate change is not the only hazard to worry about. But his arguments don’t always hold water, particularly in terms of water resources. In a series of Wall Street Journal op-eds leading up to the Copenhagen climate change meeting, Bjorn Lomborg is interviewing ’ordinary people’ about their views of climate change. Read More

Canterbury Water Management Strategy - Crikey Creek

Daniel Collins Nov 08, 2009

The Canterbury Mayoral Forum has released the Canterbury Water Management Strategy. It’s goal is to rise above the adversarial nature of Canterbury’s water resource conflicts to achieve comprehensive sustainable management. It stresses a collaborative, balanced and incremental approach. The strategy is available online, complete with 12-page executive summary (see link above). If you are a Cantabrian with a … Read More

Tim Groser to FedFarmers: Water is the key - Crikey Creek

Daniel Collins Nov 04, 2009

New Zealand doesn’t export milk and beef, or even grass. It exports water. This is how Tim Groser sees NZ’s agricultural relationship with the world. A country well-off in terms of water is well-prepared to feed a swelling global population. Tim Grosner wears many hats, but they are all connected: Minster of Trade, Minister of Conservation, Associate Minister of Foreign … Read More

Peter Gleick on peak water - Crikey Creek

Daniel Collins Oct 27, 2009

In an analogous way to peak oil, peak water refers to a peak in the production of usable water. There are differences, sure: water is mostly renewable. But where water is essentially non-renewable, such as with fossil groundwater, the analogy is spot on. Where water is renewable, the analogy is still very useful. The peak denotes the point where the … Read More