Tagged: teaching

Wordle & Schol Bio - BioBlog

Alison Campbell Sep 16, 2018

One of the things I do at Schol Bio workshops is work with students to identify the key themes that run through the exam questions from year to year. On the macro scale, there are three: human evolution, genetics, and animal & plant behaviour/responses to the environment (with an occasional admixture of biotechnology). At yesterday’s workshop in Tauranga, my friend … Read More

Preparing for scholarship: critical thinking - BioBlog

Alison Campbell Jun 27, 2018

I met with a local biology teacher today to talk about setting up a Schol Bio preparation day in the Waikato, and we also discussed things like the need for critical thinking skills (in addition to a solid base of knowledge from students’ year 12 & year 13 studies and time spent in reading more widely around the subject). So … Read More

Talking about what we should teach - BioBlog

Alison Campbell May 10, 2018

While I was on holiday (Japan – it was wonderful!) – I read Tom Haig’s interesting article about ‘curriculum wars’ over on Education Central, and it reminded me of the concerns I’ve held for some time that we don’t really talk enough about *what* to teach in our classrooms, be they university-level or in the secondary sector.  Several years back (how time … Read More

What are the challenges for First-Year Core Science Courses? - BioBlog

Alison Campbell Feb 28, 2018

Professor Karen Burke da Silva was the keynote speaker at Day 1 of the 2017 First-Year Science Educators’ Colloquium, held in Wellington. Her topic: Transforming large first year science classes: A comprehensive approach to student engagement. Currently at Flinders University, she’s been instrumental in setting up an ‘integrated teaching environment’ that’s seen a drop in withdrawals, and a marked … Read More

Opinion: Te Reo should be taught in schools – here’s why! - Guest Work

Jean Balchin Jan 25, 2018

When I was 6, my family moved to Mangonui, a little fishing village in Doubtless Bay. Besides the world-class fish and chip shop and the clouds of sprats flying around under the surface of the water, I loved Mangonui for its embrace of te ao Māori (the Māori world). I was a little Pakeha girl from the North Shore of Auckland, … Read More

Accelerated Christian Education and pseudo-scientific “education” - Guest Work

Jean Balchin Jan 15, 2018

Picture this: grey walls rising up on three sides of you as you sit, hunched over your schoolwork – a science worksheet repudiating the theory of evolution, using the Loch Ness Monster as an example for why Darwin was horrifically, inexcusably wrong.  As you fill in the blanks, copying the answers from the pages of information in … Read More

Human evolution – how do we accommodate new discoveries in our teaching? - BioBlog

Alison Campbell Jul 31, 2017

What follows is loosely based on a workshop I ran at this year’s Biolive/ChemEd secondary science teachers’ conference. (A most excellent conference, by the way – kudos to those organising & presenting.) I’ve added a bunch of hotlinked references. Back when I was in 7th form (or year 13 – i.e. a rather long time ago), the description of … Read More

I need to discuss my concern… - Infrequently Asked Questions

Lynley Hargreaves Nov 24, 2016

Distinguished Professor Viviane Robinson Education leaders can shy away from difficult conversations with teachers, or, struggle to recognise when they’ve prejudged the situation. But they can be taught to do better, and The University of Auckland’s Distinguished Professor Viviane Robinson is doing just that. Professor Robinson’s work on research-based guidance on student-centred leadership just won her the … Read More