Tagged: whales

Swimming with whales: you must know the risks and when it’s best to keep your distance - Guest Work

Guest Author Sep 11, 2020

Chantal Denise Pagel, Auckland University of Technology; Mark Orams, Auckland University of Technology, and Michael Lueck, Auckland University of Technology Three people were injured last month in separate humpback whale encounters off the Western Australia coast. The incidents happened during snorkelling tours on Ningaloo Reef when swimmers came too close to a mother and her calf. Swim encounters with … Read More

New Zealand research shows what a fat, healthy right whale looks like! - Making Waves

Otago Marine Science Jul 29, 2020

Professor Steve Dawson Scientists from the University of Otago, working with colleagues from around the world, have found that New Zealand right whales are doing much better than right whales in other parts of the world. The research was published as the feature article in the journal Marine Ecology Progress Series. Southern right whales are starting … Read More

Fossil Lucky Dip from a Lost World - Lost Worlds, Vanished Lives

Nic Rawlence Jul 10, 2018

I’m lying on a beautiful golden sand beach. The bright sun is beating down upon me. I could be on an isolated, tropical island, if not for the lone giant moa sculpture looming above my head. This sentinel to a lost world stands at the aptly named Old Bones Backpackers at Awamoa, (originally named Te Awa Kōkōmuka), south of Oamaru. Read More

NIWA Summer Series – The Sounds of Whales - Field Work

Guest Author Dec 19, 2017

The sounds of whales and dolphins rarely seen in New Zealand waters were recorded by a NIWA scientist in a pioneering underwater sound project. In March the first analysis of work undertaken by NIWA marine ecologist Dr Kim Goetz was revealed following the deployment of seven acoustic moorings in Cook Strait to record the sounds of marine mammals. NIWA … Read More

Murky waters: why is Japan still whaling in the Southern Ocean? - Guest Work

Guest Author Jan 23, 2017

By Indi Hodgson-Johnston, University of Tasmania Photographs allegedly showing Japanese whaling operations in the Southern Ocean emerged this week. Coinciding with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s visit to Australia, critics have called for greater action from the Australian government on the issue. Japan has stated that, despite various resolutions at the International Whaling Commission and criticism … Read More

Eavesdropping reveals hidden marine mammal populations in the ocean - Unsorted

Guest Author Dec 22, 2016

By Joy Tripovich, UNSW Australia and Tracey Rogers, UNSW Australia Acoustic monitoring of the calls of marine animals, such as whales and seals, could be the key to identifying new species, finding new population groups and mapping migration routes. We recently used custom-designed detection algorithms to run through 57,000 hours of underwater ocean noise to … Read More

The new international whaling resolution will do little to stop Japan killing whales - Guest Work

Guest Author Nov 02, 2016

By Indi Hodgson-Johnston, University of Tasmania Australia and New Zealand were claiming a conservation success this week, when their resolution against lethal “scientific” whaling was adopted at the International Whaling Commission’s biennial meeting in Slovenia. But in reality the non-binding decision will do little to stop Japan’s whaling program. This resolution aims to tighten the loophole … Read More

Whale of a problem: why do humpbacks protect other species? - Guest Work

Guest Author Aug 17, 2016

By Tracey Rogers, UNSW Australia A group of killer whales are on the hunt. They work together to submerge and drown a whale calf. But then more whales appear. The newly arrived humpbacks bellow a trumpet-like call, and wield their five-metre-long pectoral flippers like swords against the prowling killer whales. The killer whales are driven away from the … Read More

New editor of Journal of Royal Society of NZ - Infrequently Asked Questions

Lynley Hargreaves May 12, 2016

The journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand began its life in the 1860s covering a wide range of topics. New editor Professor Ewan Fordyce FRSNZ would like to regain a little more of that breadth of discipline. The University of Otago Professor knows something about crossing disciplinary boundaries, as a paleontologist in a Geology Department, working … Read More

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