Tagged: women in science

Embracing Mātauranga Māori and science – Suffrage 125 - Suffrage 125

Guest Author Sep 20, 2018

Yvonne Taura When I was young and growing up in Australia, becoming a scientist was far from my ideal career path. I shied away from anything to do with science, physics, or mathematics as the room was always filled with boys – and, to be honest, it was all a little intimidating. Instead, I moved more towards the creative … Read More

To all Women in Science, thank you for kicking science’s arse! – Suffrage 125 - Suffrage 125

Guest Author Sep 19, 2018

Dr Melanie Cheung I’ve been reflecting on the powerful articles celebrating women that I have read this week. Today is the 125th anniversary of women getting the vote in Aotearoa, and it feels like we have come a long way since then.  Dr Melanie Cheung, supplied. Any women working in a male-dominated field also realise that we still have … Read More

We have always sailed – Suffrage 125 - Suffrage 125

Guest Author Sep 17, 2018

Dr Lucy Stewart As writer Kameron Hurley once said regarding women in the military, “We have always fought” – women have always been involved in field research, including at sea. Aotearoa was named by Kuramārōtini, a woman on a long ocean voyage. Early research expeditions by Europeans relied heavily on indigenous women such as Sacagawea … Read More

Book review: Inferior – How Science Got Women Wrong - Scibooks

Sarah-Jane O'Connor Dec 24, 2017

Alongside Naomi Alderman’s The Power, it’s the feminist book everyone’s been reading this year. Angela Saini’s Inferior tackles how science got women wrong and who’s resetting the agenda. Saini is a science journalist with a Masters in Engineering, so she can talk with first-hand experience about some of the issues faced in sciences. Inferior: How Science Got Women Wrong—and the New … Read More

Wikipedia is where everybody starts – boosting the profile of New Zealand women in science - Griffin's Gadgets

Peter Griffin Jul 28, 2017

How many women of New Zealand science, living or deceased, can you name? Before I started working at the Royal Society running the Science Media Centre, I’d have to admit that it was an embarrassingly small number on either count. Now, I’m privileged to have met hundreds of women in science and to have learned about numerous other women who … Read More