Up and Atom

Bursting the Conservation Bubble with Birds

Kimberley Collins Oct 16, 2018

As another Bird of the Year draws to a close, Kimberley Collins reflects on why this kind of fun and uplifting advocacy is an important way to get New Zealanders to take an interest in conservation. Every year, thousands of New Zealanders flock to the polls to vote for their favourite bird. Well-known and enthusiastic “campaign managers” hit the streets (and … Read More

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The Science of Coffee Naps (And Why You Should Take Them)

Kimberley Collins Sep 04, 2016

Do you find yourself struggling to stay awake in the middle of the afternoon? Research shows having a coffee nap, where you drink cup of coffee and taking a 20 minute nap, is the most effective way to restore your energy.  Many of us know this feeling… (Photo by Wikimedia Commons) The “coffee nap” strategy is a great way to maximise the effect … Read More

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An Inventory of Citizen Science

Kimberley Collins Aug 22, 2016

The New Zealand Landcare Trust has launched ‘An Inventory of Citizen Science in New Zealand‘ to understand what’s happening in the citizen science space. An Inventory of Citizen Science, which was published earlier this month. The inventory, written by Dr. Monica Peters, includes a range of projects studying everything from children monitoring long-tailed bats, to patrolling beaches for dead seabirds and monitoring … Read More

Why coral reefs wouldn’t be the same without big fish (and their pee)

Kimberley Collins Aug 18, 2016

Scientists have known for decades that fish urine is important for coral reefs. Now, a new study has found urine excreted by large fish is critical to the survival and growth of these fragile ecosystems.  Like most living things, coral reefs need nutrients to grow. In coral reefs, fish provide these, holding the nutrients in their tissue and excreting them through their urine … Read More

Studs or Duds? Bird Sperm and Conservation

Kimberley Collins Aug 17, 2016

Dr Helen Taylor is one of thirteen scientists from New Zealand who have entered Thinkable’s 180 seconds of science and is using the opportunity to talk about bird sperm. The competition, supported by the Royal Society of New Zealand, gives early career researchers a unique opportunity to share their passion for innovative research in a 3 minute video. Helen’s video investigates what bird … Read More

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